Acknowledging Nursing Homes and the Elderly

By Alexander O'Conner

A team performs only as well as its weakest player, and as the world combats Covid-19, it needs to give elderly people and nursing homes the same amount of attention it gives to hospitals. 

In America, 60 percent of people 65 years and older live with two health conditions such as lung disease, heart disease, or cancer. Of that age group who resides outside of nursing homes, 7 million are considered frail, which makes the common cold and other minor setbacks hard to fight. 

 

These statistics mean that many elderly people and nursing home residents stand very little chance against coronavirus. Looking at Philadelphia’s death rate among older generations confirms that bitter fact. As of May 2, 374 elderly people passed away from coronavirus complications. This makes up more than half of Philadelphia’s total coronavirus death toll. In total, the virus affected more than 1,800 elderly Philadelphians as of May 3. 

 

Right now, a cure feels a long time away from reaching everyone and more elderly lives are lost daily. Right now, Philadelphia and the rest of the world possess the ability to help nursing homes more by following CDC protocols. Without necessary health precautions in nursing homes, the virus can easily enter, infect, and kill many residents. The virus will continue to grow exponentially in nursing homes as it first started in Philadelphia on March 20. 

 

In this fight against coronavirus, the world begins to act like a team. Healthcare workers, musicians, cleaners, garbage workers, grocers, and so many people work together to make the world a little bit better right now. Let’s work together to make things better for our loved ones in nursing homes, our grandmothers, uncles, and other elderly citizens